Brexit: What do we think?

Brexit: What do we think?

A couple of months since the referendum on whether the UK should leave the European Union, ComRes have released a poll of attitudes towards Brexit.  Here, we take a look at the numbers and give you 7 key conclusions from the poll. 

1.       Generally, people feel positive about Britain’s future after the referendum.  Of all respondents, when asked how positive they felt about Britain’s future following the vote to leave the European Union, 62% said they felt positive.  35% of the voters polled said the opposite – that they felt negative about our future following the result, giving a net result of +27 points.  We can’t tell from this data point alone whether or not this is an endorsement of Brexit or just the reflection of a view that Brexit is of little importance to Britain’s future – but it does seem to suggest, at least, that Brexit is not seen as a large threat to the country’s future.

2.       And that positivity is spread pretty well across the United Kingdom.  What may be quite surprising is the extent to which this positivity stretches across the union.  The guys at ComRes cut up voters into 12 separate geographies, and of those, only two – Scotland and the North-East – felt either neutral or net negative about our future following the decision to leave on 23rd June.  Take a look at the table below:

Country/region

Positive

Negative

Net

Scotland

49%

49%

0

North East

45%

47%

-2

North West

60%

40%

+20

Yorkshire and Humberside

70%

26%

+44

West Midlands

69%

28%

+41

East Midlands

62%

36%

+26

Wales

79%

20%

+59

Eastern

77%

21%

+56

London

55%

39%

+16

South East

64%

32%

+32

South West

59%

39%

+20

Northern Ireland

53%

47%

+6

The results from this data set are quite clear: the positive feeling about the country’s future is spread widely across the United Kingdom and particularly England.  While geographies like Scotland, the North East and Northern Ireland feel less positive (returning net positivity ratings of 0, -2 and +6, respectively), other geographies feel extremely positive.  Wales, the East of England, and Yorkshire and the Humberside each return positive net ratings in the 44-59 range.

3.       But while people are positive about Britain’s future, they are less bullish on Brexit’s effect on our reputation.  Though the evidence is fairly clear that Britons feel confident about the country’s future, they are far less convinced that Brexit will be good for Britain’s reputation.  Of those polled, 27% said the referendum result would improve our reputation abroad, while 62% said Brexit would not improve it.  ComRes also asked its respondents whether they though Britain’s reputation abroad had been damaged by the referendum result.  People were split on this – with both ‘agree’ and ‘disagree’ chalking up 46%.

4.       We can’t tell much about what this means for Scottish independence.  There has been much talk about whether or not the referendum result would result in greater calls for secession given Scotland’s overall vote to have the United Kingdom remain inside the European Union.  Scottish voters were asked whether or not they felt more or less a part of the UK following the result, and the results are mixed.  While 65% said they felt the same, 26% said they felt less a part of the union, with only 6% saying they felt more a part of it.   For Welsh voters, the feeling was generally more pro-UK.  10% said they felt more a part of the UK, with 8% saying the opposite; an overwhelming 83%, though, said the referendum result had them feeling the same.

5.       There is no real gender gap in terms of attitudes towards Brexit’s effect on Britain’s reputation.  There isn’t much to see here, to be perfectly honest.  When asked whether or not they felt the referendum improved the country’s reputation abroad, men and women both gave a 35-ish point lead to ‘not improved’.

6.       Higher socio-economic groups tend to be less optimistic about our future following the referendum than lower ones.  While all socio-economic categories feel net positive about Britain’s future, ABC1 voters generally feel less positive than C2DE voters.  Here’s the breakdown:

Group

Positive

Negative

Net

AB

57%

41%

+16

C1

63%

34%

+29

C2

66%

30%

+36

DE

64%

32%

+32

7.       There is a clear age trend with respect to attitudes towards Brexit.  If we take a look at the attitudes voters have towards the country’s future following the result of the referendum, while all age categories feel net positively, there is a very clear – and strong – trend.  Young voters tend to feel slightly positive about our future, while as voters get older, they feel more positively about Britain’s future.  Here are the precise numbers:

Age group

Positive

Negative

Net

18-24

51%

46%

+5

25-34

52%

44%

+8

35-44

62%

37%

+25

45-54

68%

29%

+39

55-64

63%

35%

+28

65+

71%

25%

+46

That’s it our conclusions from this ComRes poll.  We hope you’ve found some good nuggets of data you haven’t come across before.  If you like our work, be sure to follow us on Twitter and add our website to your ‘favourites’ bar!  And, thanks to the phenomenal growth in our viewership, we’re delighted to be able to start our first weekly newsletter at the end of this week.  If you’d like to subscribe to our mailing list, we’ll email you once a week with the best in the polls and commentary from around the web.  We won’t pass on your email to anyone else.  If you want to subscribe, scroll down and fill out our simple form.  We’re so excited about this and would love to have you on board!

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