Is this proof that Twitter is a left-wing echo chamber?

Is this proof that Twitter is a left-wing echo chamber?

A couple of days ago, GfK released their first national political poll since they predicted the 2005 election.  And it caused quite a stir, with Jeremy Corbyn polling a lower approval rating among British voters than even Donald Trump.  It also put the Tories 13 points ahead of Labour.

But GfK polled voters on their use of social media, too, and the results are very interesting.

Take a look at the graphic below, showing the voting intentions of British voters as a whole and then the voting intentions of voters who use Twitter and those who use Facebook.

While GfK gives the Tories a 13 point lead (lower, by the way, than some other pollsters), among Twitterers and Facebook users, the results differ:

Among voters who use Twitter, Labour actually has a lead of 9 points.  Of these users, 30% intend to vote Conservative compared with 41% of voters as a whole, and 39% of these Twitter users intend to vote Labour compared with just 28% of voters in general.  

And although the difference isn't as stark, Facebook users are also far more likely to vote Labour than voters as a whole, although the Conservatives keep a lead.  36% of Facebook users intend to vote Conservative while 32% intend to vote Labour.  So, while the Tories still maintain a 4 point lead in this group, it's a long way off the 13 points they lead by among the totality of voters.

Now, this is just one poll and just a handful of data points, so we should urge caution at this point before making any certain conclusions.  But even in this one poll, the results are fairly dramatic: social media users really don't represent voters in general - especially those who use Twitter.

So if you want to get a feel of what voters think, it's best not to jump onto social media.

May vs Corbyn

May vs Corbyn

Corbyn's Trumpian approval rating

Corbyn's Trumpian approval rating